What are Healthy pH Levels in the Body?

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When you hear the term pH level, you are probably transported back to some vague memory from high school science class but most people are not aware of how important it is for them to have a good understanding of how the pH levels in their physical bodies work. Failing to know how important the pH equilibrium in your body is can result in your having a highly acidic system, an issue that can lead to many different health conditions. Let’s take a close look at what pH levels are and how they affect your body so that you can stay feeling as fit and good as possible.

What Are pH Levels?

pH is the measure used in chemistry to determine the acidity in solutions in which the solvent is water (an aqueous solution). Thus, pH levels tell us how acidic an environment is and this is important because certain compounds flourish in acidity, and many of these are not the kinds that we want  flowing through our systems (i.e. yeast, certain bacteria).

pH in the Body

The acidity (or pH levels) in our bodies is determined by metabolic byproducts and our diets. The pH scale exists from 0 to 14 and when the body has a pH level that is lower than 7 it has become too acidic. High acidity in the body creates an environment in which the following health problems flourish:

  • Candida (yeast)
  • Allergies
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Leaky gut syndrome
  • Weakening of skin, bones, nails, and hair
  • Cramps
  • Anxiety and panic disorders
  • Increased risk of the spread of cancerous cells

From the list above, you can see that you don’t want your body to be home to a high acidity environment. But how can you protect yourself against low pH levels and their corresponding ailments?

Maintaining pH Equilibrium

So how do we maintain a healthy pH balance in our bodies? There are several ways that we can protect our bodies from the ravages of low pH and the good news is that they are fairly simple and are within our control. First, it is important to drink a lot of water (the recommended 8 glasses a day) as water neutralizes acidity. Second, it is crucial that our eating habits do make room for food that lowers our acidity: processed grains, junk food, red meat, sugars, and soda. The third and maybe most important way that we can keep our pH balanced is by taking control of our emotions. Research shows that emotions such as anger, fear, jealousy, and hate all facilitate the creation of acidic-forming chemical reactions in the body by the hypothalamus while emotions such as happiness, love, and joy create alkaline-forming chemical reactions that neutralize acidity. Your mood and the way you think about things can literally affect your pH levels!

Understanding the importance of pH levels is vital to maintaining a healthy body and serves as yet another example of how we control the health and vitality of our physical bodies not only by what we eat but also by how we think. You are the creator of the environment of both your body and mind—so why not make the choice to live in love, health, and happiness.

Pasteurized Milk and Multiple Sclerosis

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Dairy is often promoted as a major source of the nutrition that we need but at the same time it is also one of the most prevalent causes of allergies in humans. Lactose intolerance is a widespread phenomenon and many people also feel that milk just does not agree with their digestive systems. The main problem with milk in terms of health and the development of illnesses and allergies is pasteurization. Since Louis Pasteur invented the method, pasteurization has been used as a means of controlling pathogens in the milk given by dairy cows, but there are many drawbacks to the process. Among many other ailments, research shows that there is a link between the pasteurization of milk and the development of multiple sclerosis. Let’s take a closer look at what pasteurization does and how it contributes to MS and other ailments in order that you may be more informed about your dietary choices.

Pasteurization is the process of heating up milk to an intense heat for a short period of time in order to rid the milk of pathogens and contaminants. While this is a good practice in terms of getting rid of bad bacteria, pasteurization also gets rid of many of the health benefits of the milk such as the minerals and nutrients like vitamin B6, B12, and C. Probably the most harmful effect of pasteurization is the destruction of the enzymes that contribute to digestion and immunity. One of these enzymes is lactase, which allows the milk to breakdown the milk sugar lactose, contributing to high rates of lactose intolerance. Because pasteurized milk is stripped of its nutrients as well as enzymes it is unable to perform one of its most vital functions—pass on the immune supporting compounds that trigger the immune response and the growth of antibodies. Thus, pasteurized milk becomes a trigger for various illnesses but especially autoimmune diseases like MS. This claim is backed up by science—researchers at Faculte de Medicine in Farnce found a high correlation between drinking pasteurized milk and the development of MS in their study entitled “Correlation between milk and dairy product consumption and multiple sclerosis prevalence: a worldwide study” which was published in 1992.
The scientific community has known about the dangers of pasteurization for years but this does not mean that the food industry will continue to anything but turn a blind eye to the research. Pasteurization is a process that is tied up just as much in politics and money as it is in milk. Still, there are ways to avoid the harms of pasteurization and its potentially damaging side effects like MS. Raw milk or unpasteurized milk is more natural and does not harm the natural enzymes or nutrients. Additionally, there is always the option to choose a non-dairy diet by sticking to soy and other milk replacements such as rice milk. You only have one body in this life so it is important that you take care of it and that means knowing the risks associated with the various processes at work in the modern food industry.