Champix as a Quit Smoking Method

Michelle Meiklejohn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Millions of smokers around the world are looking for a way to put out the last cigarette for good. Unfortunately, when it comes to smoking cessation, there seem to be as many strategies for quitting smoking as there are smokers. So how does a smoker know what to do? It can feel confusing and overwhelming indeed.

The truth is, the best and most effective way to quit smoking is through choice or mind over matter. Research shows that smoking is actually a habit and not a physiological addiction, but the mainstream still has not latched onto this idea for several reasons. First, many smokers want a quick fix in terms of smoking cessation. They want to hear that they have an addiction that can be cured because this takes a lot of the burden off of their own will power. For smokers with this mentality the ubiquity of smoking cessation pills and patches seem like the perfect way to kick their habit. However, these quick fix methods don’t necessarily work to address the underlying psychological reasons for smoking, they do not break old habits and help build new ones, and worst of all, they can be dangerous.  One of the smoking cessation drugs on the market is Champix, so let’s take a closer look at what this drug claims to do and the potential negative side effects of using it so that you can make healthy choices for yourself when it comes to quitting smoking.

Champix is a pharmaceutical drug that contains varenicline, an active ingredient that supposedly helps people addicted to nicotine quit smoking. The varenicline supposedly stimulates the nicotine receptors in the brain to relieve cravings and withdrawal symptoms. According to those promoting the drug, taking Champix will stop cravings and will eventually lead people to stop smoking. However, if you believe that smoking is actually a psychosocial habit, these claims seem a bit suspect.

The real reason people should be wary about using Champix is because it has been associated with many negative side effects. These include:

  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Abnormal dreams
  • Fatigue
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Tremor
  • Cardiovascular problems

While not everyone who takes Champix will suffer from these side effects, they are troubling enough that they make you think twice about using the drug as a smoking cessation tool.

If you are trying to quit smoking then pills and patches are not necessarily the way to go. While some people swear that they help, we do know that they will not help you address the underlying psychosocial issues related to your smoking habit and they can sometimes be dangerous to your health. Conversely, treating your smoking habit with therapy, such as hypnotherapy, NLP, lazer therapy or quit smoking book aids; is harmless to your body and it will help you defeat smoking by giving you the tools you need to mindfully change your habits. Drugs and patches are not the best way to fix the problem—learn to take control of your own choices and make new choices and build new habits that can last a lifetime.