Champix as a Quit Smoking Method

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Millions of smokers around the world are looking for a way to put out the last cigarette for good. Unfortunately, when it comes to smoking cessation, there seem to be as many strategies for quitting smoking as there are smokers. So how does a smoker know what to do? It can feel confusing and overwhelming indeed.

The truth is, the best and most effective way to quit smoking is through choice or mind over matter. Research shows that smoking is actually a habit and not a physiological addiction, but the mainstream still has not latched onto this idea for several reasons. First, many smokers want a quick fix in terms of smoking cessation. They want to hear that they have an addiction that can be cured because this takes a lot of the burden off of their own will power. For smokers with this mentality the ubiquity of smoking cessation pills and patches seem like the perfect way to kick their habit. However, these quick fix methods don’t necessarily work to address the underlying psychological reasons for smoking, they do not break old habits and help build new ones, and worst of all, they can be dangerous.  One of the smoking cessation drugs on the market is Champix, so let’s take a closer look at what this drug claims to do and the potential negative side effects of using it so that you can make healthy choices for yourself when it comes to quitting smoking.

Champix is a pharmaceutical drug that contains varenicline, an active ingredient that supposedly helps people addicted to nicotine quit smoking. The varenicline supposedly stimulates the nicotine receptors in the brain to relieve cravings and withdrawal symptoms. According to those promoting the drug, taking Champix will stop cravings and will eventually lead people to stop smoking. However, if you believe that smoking is actually a psychosocial habit, these claims seem a bit suspect.

The real reason people should be wary about using Champix is because it has been associated with many negative side effects. These include:

  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Abnormal dreams
  • Fatigue
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Tremor
  • Cardiovascular problems

While not everyone who takes Champix will suffer from these side effects, they are troubling enough that they make you think twice about using the drug as a smoking cessation tool.

If you are trying to quit smoking then pills and patches are not necessarily the way to go. While some people swear that they help, we do know that they will not help you address the underlying psychosocial issues related to your smoking habit and they can sometimes be dangerous to your health. Conversely, treating your smoking habit with therapy, such as hypnotherapy, NLP, lazer therapy or quit smoking book aids; is harmless to your body and it will help you defeat smoking by giving you the tools you need to mindfully change your habits. Drugs and patches are not the best way to fix the problem—learn to take control of your own choices and make new choices and build new habits that can last a lifetime.

Rationalization: The Smoking Blame Game


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Smokers tend to have many excuses for why they started smoking and why they can’t stop. One of the most common ways that smokers deflect their role in their own smoking habit is by blaming it on others. You have probably heard a smoker say at one point or another that they started smoking because their parents did it or they can’t quit because their girlfriend smokes and it would be too hard to quit.  In psychology, this form of excuse making is called rationalization and if we take a close look at this phenomenon we will be able to get better insight into the mind of the smoker.

Rationalization is a defense mechanism that people use to justify or explain controversial behaviors or feelings in order to make them seem more tolerable or acceptable. People use rationalization to encourage behavior that is unhealthy or self-destructive and to give them an escape route to keep practicing such behavior when it is clear that it is detrimental to their health and well-being. Smokers who rationalize their habit by way of the “everyone else is doing it” or “they made me” method seek to normalize smoking and give themselves a false sense of comfort that what they are doing isn’t all that bad, when in reality it is wreaking incredible damage on their mental and physical bodies.

Smokers who rationalize their habit by blaming it on others use it as an avoidance tactic to circumvent what is in their eyes an inconvenient truth: smoking is a choice and you are the only person in charge of the choices you make. Nobody kidnaps a smoker’s child and tells him that they won’t return her unless he smokes everyday. Most partners and parents don’t hold a gun to a smoker’s head if they don’t light up the next cigarette. Just as you have the power to choose to smoke you have the power to quit and start building habits that reinforce a healthy lifestyle. The victim mentality, the one that is so strongly reinforced by rationalization, will only keep you a prisoner of your own mind, separated from personal growth and healthy living.

There are many ways to combat the victim mentality that goes along with the smoking blame game. If you feel that you need help learning how to make healthy choice and stop harmful habits you should consider talking to someone about it. Consider therapeutic methods that are based on mind over matter and personal responsibility, like hypnotherapy, can also be a great help. Stop blaming others and liberate yourself by taking charge of your own life—quit smoking today!

Smoking Leads To A Shorter Life


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Smoking leads to a shorter life. Sounds like a dramatic news headline, but there is nothing dramatic or comical about it: smoking will kill you faster, plain and simple. One of the main reasons you should quit smoking if you have a tobacco habit is because quitting today will start to build your life expectancy back up. Let’s take a look at some of the ways in which smoking affects your life expectancy so that you can make the decision to change your habits today.

We are all well aware that smoking leads to various serious health problems such as lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease. Smoking also weakens the immune systems and makes your body more prone to viral and bacterial infections. All of these factors combined contribute to a shorter life expectancy for smokers: experts estimate that a smokers’ life expectancy decreases by about 10 years in comparison with non-smokers. This number is chilling when you think about it-ten years less to enjoy your family, friends, hobbies, and anything else that you cherish about your life. The good news is, quitting smoking will put you back on the track to health and a longer life. The sooner you quit smoking, the sooner you begin to attenuate the harmful effects of tobacco so that you can rebuild your life expectancy. This is particularly true if you are a young smoker: according to a study published in the British Medical Journal, smokers who quit before the age of 30 eventually have the same life expectancy of non-smokers. This statistic provides an excellent incentive to quit smoking now, especially if you are young.

There will always be skeptics concerning the dramatic impact smoking has on your life expectancy because there will always be exceptions: there are people who have smoked a pack a day for 50 years and never develop one cancerous cell and there are people who are health nuts that die from some form of cancer when they are only 40. Don’t let the pro-smoking cynics fool you: the aforementioned anomalies are smoke screened (no pun intended) used to cloud out the fact that smoking is extremely and reliably hazardous to your health, and it will lead to health problems if you engage in it long-term.

If you want to avoid decreasing your life expectancy, then quit smoking. There are many factors in life that can lead to an early death, so why willingly engage in increasing your risks? Smoking is a habit and you have the power to quit. You may not have the power to control how long you live, but you do have the power to control your habits and avoid those that detract from your physical well-being.

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