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4 Tips to Becoming a Successful Non Smoker

Becoming a non smoker can be a challenge – but it doesn’t need to be.  There is so much information available these days to help people to give up smoking, safely and without discomfort. Here are 4 rally important ways in which you can help yourself achieve your goal.

1. Sugar in Cigarettes – Really?

Have a good supply of fruit and be prepared as cigarettes do contain sugar.  So when people stop smoking, being aware of this will throw some light on why they become grumpy and irritable. So if you are quitting cigarettes always have some fruit with you or something sweet. If you find you are angry or cross take some deep breaths, have something sweet to eat or drink.

2. Deep Breathing

As a smoker people take deep breaths with each puff from a cigarette.  Once they stop smoking this type of breathing stops.  So it is important to continue taking deep breaths. Deep breathing allows your mind to focus on the breathing rather than being annoyed about something. So try using the 4, 7, 8 method of breathing. That is count to four as you are breathing in; hold it for the count of 7; and then slowly breathe out for the count of 8. Another good time to use this form of breathing is when you are trying to go to sleep. There are times when no matter how hard you try, sleep just seems to elude you.

This breathing exercise is a natural tranquilizer for the nervous system. This exercise is subtle when you first try it, but gains in power with repetition and practice. Do it at least twice a day. You cannot do it too frequently. Do not do more than four breaths at one time for the first month of practice. Later, if you wish, you can extend it to eight breaths. If you feel a little lightheaded when you first breathe this way, do not be concerned; it will pass.

3. Water is Extremely Important

Be prepared and have plenty of water on hand when quitting. Your body has a blueprint of where it should be. So once it registers you have quit smoking, it tries to get rid of all the toxins and poisons out of your body as quickly as it can. This is going to impact on your kidneys which can create discomfort and even pain. So you need to flush those toxins and poisons out of your system as quickly as you can by drinking lots of water.

4. Nicotine depresses emotions

Experiencing sadness within the first few days of quitting is not unusual. Some even feel so sad they cannot stop crying. So why does this happen to some people and not others? People who have experienced trauma or difficult challenges in their lives are more likely to experience this. Smoking and other habits such as alcohol are often used as a prop to help them cope with life. If you can relate to this then it is possibly a good idea to address these before giving up the smoking.  Look at the options you have available to address these including The Richards Trauma Process.

The Richards Trauma Process™

Before giving up smoking review your situation and decide if this is a good time for you to quit smoking. It is often a good idea to deal with those events or negative experiences in your life that have been holding you back before progressing. Being ready to quit smoking means you are prepared mentally and emotionally.

The Richards Trauma Process™ provides a very powerful way of addressing major trauma, including PTSD, anxiety, depression, phobias and panic attacks. It resolves these issues quickly, effectively and very safely.

The Richards Trauma Process™ could be described as Hypnosis on steroids. It is fast – normally 3 sessions. It is efficient, producing consistent positive results. It is long lasting with clients reporting wellness 12 months on. It is applicable for any trauma based issue, including Extreme Trauma, PTSD, Depression and Anxiety.

Is your life being ruled by the on-going impacts and pain of past trauma? Are depression, phobias, panic attacks and anxiety controlling your days and ruling your nights? Perhaps you have sunk into ‘survival mode’ rather than living a full, rich life which may seem impossible at the moment. Are you at a point in your life where you have given up on even allowing yourself to dream of being free from this ‘condition’?

Perhaps it is time to address those issues so you can move on with your life with confidence, not allowing those negatives emotions control who you are.  A few people will stop smoking however after a short while will start again. They may become stressed or upset and then resort to cigarettes to “get them through”.  However when asked if the cigarette helped them, their response is always that it didn’t. Sometimes it may feel as though it is helping for a few minutes however that is the power of the unconscious mind reawakening the smoking habit.

So if you are seeking help and would like to stop smoking then make contact with Maureen Hamilton who has had years of experience in not only helping people to stop smoking also resolve those negatives issues.

Impact of Smoking Ads on Children

A big part of keeping children smoke free is to attack tobacco’s advertising capabilities. Children have malleable minds that are easily shaped by external influences; they soak them up like a sponge, storing up the behaviors and habits that will characterize their adult life. Thus, children are much more responsive to images, cartoons, and advertising campaigns than are adults. For as long as tobacco has been advertising, they have associated smoking with independence, sophistication, beauty, and fun. While these concepts primarily target teens and adults, children are often left absorbing, consciously or unconsciously, that smoke free is not the way to be if you want to be in the in-crowd or achieve success.

While tobacco companies have always maintained that they do not target children specifically, these claims were put to the test during the 10 years that Camel’s Joe Camel reigned over billboards, t-shirts, and cigarette packages across the globe. Joe Camel seemed almost a deliberate attempt at keeping children from pursuing smoke free lifestyles; according to a 1991 report by the Journal of the American Medical Association, children were able to match pictures of Joe Camel with a cigarette just as often as they were able to match Mickey Mouse with the Disney logo. Yikes. Joe Camel’s cartoon images had imprinted into the minds of many children during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, and the AMA study showed just how integrated he had become with the fabric of society.

It’s hard to stay smoke free if cigarettes have a cartoon just as identifiable as Mickey Mouse, and this line of reasoning ultimately led to the abolition of Joe Camel. But Big Tobacco advertising remains, and so does its tie to leading children away from smoke free lifestyles. Children and adolescents are more than twice as likely to light up a cigarette from one of the three most advertised tobacco brands, Marlboro, Camel, and Newport, and a 2011 study conducted by the Dartmouth Medical School concludes that “specific images from tobacco ads predict” and encourage smoking among teenagers and children.

Though there is plenty of evidence that supports the claim that tobacco advertising leads children away from smoke free lifestyles, there are still many skeptics, and many are not card-carrying members of Big Tobacco. For example, a lot has been done, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, to eradicate the power of tobacco advertising, and still smoking is on the rise. The skeptics of tobacco advertising’s influence on children are correct that advertising is not the only factor in keeping children smoke free; it is up to parents and educators to talk to kids about the dangers of tobacco use, and to be good role models themselves by refraining from smoking in front of their children. A parent’s influence is more powerful than any advertisement. Additionally, remaining smoke free is ultimately a choice that each individual must face, a choice not to engage in the bad habit, but instead choose a smoke free lifestyle.

Therefore, it is important to combine restrictions on tobacco advertising with personal responsibility-both contribute to the delicate balance of influencing children to remain smoke free. A big part of keeping children smoke free is to attack tobacco’s advertising capabilities. Children have malleable minds that are easily shaped by external influences; they soak them up like a sponge, storing up the behaviors and habits that will characterize their adult life. Thus, children are much more responsive to images, cartoons, and advertising campaigns than are adults. For as long as tobacco has been advertising, they have associated smoking with independence, sophistication, beauty, and fun. While these concepts primarily target teens and adults, children are often left absorbing, consciously or unconsciously, that smoke free is not the way to be if you want to be in the in-crowd or achieve success.

If you found this article of interest and would like to be notified as more articles become available subscribe on my website www.LifeCoachToQuitSmoking.com.  Also ‘Like’ my Facebook page to get exclusive offers, share your stories and join our community at www.facebook.com/lifecoachtoquitsmoking.

Tobacco Advertising

Does Australia’s Strict Approach to Tobacco Advertising actually Help People Quit Smoking?

Australia is one of the world leaders in the war against tobacco advertising. The idea has been that to help people quit smoking, the tobacco advertising industry must have its wings clipped. It has been illegal to advertise tobacco products on the radio and television since 1976 and in 1990 it became illegal to promote tobacco in Australian magazines and newspapers. The Tobacco Advertising Prohibition of 1992 now bans most forms of tobacco advertising, and plain packaging cigarettes will likely be the next step in the Australian war on Big Tobacco.

Australia is indeed a bellwether of global anti-tobacco initiatives, but do these efforts really help its populace quit smoking? According to the New South Wales Cancer Council, Australians have quit smoking in dramatic numbers, particularly Australian men. In 1945, approximately 72% of Australian men were regular smokers and 26% of Australian women smoked. Contrast these numbers with recent Australian statistics: In 2007, 18.6% of Australian men were regular smokers and 14.5% of women were regular smokers. On the surface, and when the entire populace is taken into account, it looks as though clamping down on the tobacco industry’s ability to advertise freely has massive amounts of people to quit smoking, and this is true.  But a deeper look at the statistics reveals a troubling trend: smoking rates in Australia are highest amongst both the youth and aboriginals.  The highest smoking rates among non-indigenous Australians are men aged 18-24 (34%) and women aged 25-34 (27%). Among the indigenous population, smoking rates are even higher, hovering steadily around 50%. This may be due to their disenfranchisement, but they are subjected to the same lack of tobacco advertising as the non-indigenous population, so something else is at play here because both young non-indigenous and indigenous Australians have not quit smoking—they have continued to inhale.

Disturbing Trends

What do these disturbing trends among Australian youth say about Australia’s strict curbing of tobacco advertising? If the Australian youth, a generation that has grown up under these strict regulations, are the primary smokers in Australia, then something must be amiss. The problem likely lies in the fact that too much emphasis is being placed on Big Tobacco and not enough is placed on the personal responsibility each person has in shaping their own tobacco use habits.  It is very easy to point the finger as long as we don’t have to point the finger at ourselves and today’s youth are accustomed to laying the blame for their behavior on external influences. But external influences do not force the habit of smoking—they merely influence.  If a person wants to quit smoking, they must make it a personal priority. It is an excellent thing that Australia places so much emphasis on taking the legs out from underneath tobacco advertising, but there needs to be more emphasis placed on the role that personal responsibility has in helping people quit smoking. A smoking commercial might show us cigarettes, but we are the ones who hold the lighters.

If you found this article of interest and would like to be notified as more articles become available subscribe on my website www.LifeCoachToQuitSmoking.com.  Also ‘Like’ my Facebook page to get exclusive offers, share your stories and join our community at www.facebook.com/lifecoachtoquitsmoking.