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Little-known Facts About E-cigarettes

Despite our growing knowledge that smoking tobacco is bad for us more than 8 million Australians have tried smoking at least once in their life and 3.1 million are currently cigarette smokers. Smoking cigarettes is known to cause damage to every organ in your body, and smoking-related illnesses are responsible for 14,900 deaths in Australia [source: Better Health AU]. But nearly 70 percent of smokers report they want to quit, and a little more than 42 percent say they’ve tried to quit during the past year. In 2013 there was a 10 percent decrease in cigarette sales in the Australia and while that directly followed an increase in the cigarette tax, it’s not only price that’s changing the habits of Australian smokers. Electronic cigarettes (known also as e-cigarettes) have also contributed. Global sales of smokeless tobacco products, including smokeless inhalers, has grown to nearly $3 billion — and continues to grow. In an attempt to quit the tobacco habit as many as one-fifth of smokers have tried e-cigarettes [source: Ross].

Where did e-cigarettes come from?

E-cigarettes were first developed in China and were introduced to the Australian market in 2009. Many are similar enough in appearance to be mistaken for regular tobacco cigarettes. But one look inside and you’ll see the main difference: This is a tobacco-free product. E-cigs are actually vaporizers; instead of burning tobacco, the mechanism heats up a liquid. The liquid turns into vapor, which is then inhaled, or “vaped.” While some argue that vapor offers health advantages over traditional cigarette smoke, regulatory agencies and some health experts aren’t so sure that’s true. Before you consider taking up the e-cigarette habit, read on to get the facts.

How E-Cigarettes Work

They look like the real thing. The end glows as you inhale. As you exhale, you puff out a cloud of what looks like smoke. It’s vapor, similar to the fog you might see at rock shows, says M. Brad Drummond, MD. He’s an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

All e-cigarettes work basically the same way. Inside, there’s a battery, a heating element, and a cartridge that holds nicotine and other liquids and flavorings. Features and costs vary. Some are disposable. Others have a rechargeable battery and refillable cartridges. Using an e-cigarette is called “vaping.”

Are They Safe?

The nicotine inside the cartridges is addictive. When you stop using it, you can get withdrawal symptoms including feeling irritable, depressed, restless and anxious. It can be dangerous for people with heart problems. It may also harm your arteries over time.

So far, evidence suggests that e-cigarettes may be safer than regular cigarettes. The biggest danger from tobacco is the smoke, and e-cigarettes don’t burn. Tests show the levels of dangerous chemicals they give off are a fraction of what you’d get from a real cigarette. But what’s in them can vary.

“E-cigarettes may be less harmful than cigarettes,” Drummond says. “But we still don’t know enough about their long-term risks or the effects of secondhand exposure.”

Pro and Con

E-cigarettes have triggered a fierce debate among health experts who share the same goal — reducing the disease and death caused by tobacco. But they disagree about whether e-cigarettes make the problem better or worse.

Opponents say that because nicotine is addictive, e-cigarettes could be a “gateway drug,” leading nonsmokers and kids to use tobacco. They also worry that manufacturers — with huge advertising budgets and celebrity endorsements — could make smoking popular again. That would roll back decades of progress in getting people to quit or never start smoking.

Others look at possible benefits for smokers. “Obviously, it would be best if smokers could quit completely,” says Michael Siegel, MD, MPH, a professor at Boston University’s School of Public Health. “But if that’s not possible, I think they’d be a lot better off with e-cigarettes. They’re a safer alternative.”

Siegel compares replacing tobacco with e-cigarettes to heroin users switching to the painkiller methadone. The replacement may have its own risks, but it’s safer.

Some supporters believe that e-cigarettes could help people quit, just like nicotine gum. Research hasn’t shown that yet, though.

 

Living with a Partner Who Smokes

Are you a non-smoker living with a partner who smokes?

How does that feel? Did you ever smoke and are now a non smoker? You must feel so proud of yourself and your achievement. Yes, it is an achievement and you have made it – so well done!

Have you been receiving lots of comments and congratulations from family and friends?

Family are usually the ones who appreciate the sacrifice and effort you have made because they are the ones who worry about you. Clients often tell me that their partner hasn’t made them give up. However so often the smell, mess and worry about their partners health as a smoker is the true reality of their concern and silence. They feel helpless as I did with my husband when he continued to smoke. Being a trained nurse and knowing the facts resulted in a great deal of stress especially with four young children. When he had his first heart attack I was scared and worried even more when he decided he wanted to work in PNG. Thankfully the hospital on Bougainville was the best equipped hospital in PNG. So we were blessed.

Twenty months later when he had his second heart attack I was working as the Nursing Superintendent at the hospital. The Medical Superintendent medivac’d him out the next day so he was in Brisbane when they diagnosed him two days later with extensive lung cancer. This had caused a blockage of one of the main arteries to his heart resulting in his heart attack. I sent one of the trained staff to travel with him so I could stay with the children.

The dangers of living on Bougainville

At that time Bougainville was becoming more isolated with the violence; the airport had been destroyed along with all the planes except one which had been severely damaged. However the staff were able to repair the plane sufficiently which allowed it to continue flying. It was a difficult time as I had two children still on the island. However a very dear friend agreed to care for the children until we could organise flights out of Bougainville. They also packed up our house which was a huge task. Such kindness is never forgotten as another very kind person gave up their seat on the next available flight to allow me to travel to Brisbane all the while unsure of how my husband was doing. We had to make four stops including an overnight stay in Cairns due to the problems on Bougainville. At every stop I wasn’t sure if I had a seat as I hadn’t booked. However the airline used their emergency seating to accommodate me. When I arrived in Brisbane my husband was very sick as they had started chemotherapy. There was such a lot of cancer the body struggled to remove the dead cells from the cancer and chemo.

What about the Children?

I was delighted when the children arrived three days later and we could spend time with their father. We had 11 months with him before he died a most unpleasant death having gone through chemo and later on radiotherapy when he was diagnosed with brain tumours. However I will always look back on those 11 months and feel gratitude for this time with him. Wherever I can I will continue to help other families so their loved one can have additional time with them. So love your partner, families and the world at large. You have had your life extended by up to 14 years now so love your life and enjoy those people around you.

If you or someone you care about are stuck in the grip of a tobacco habit there are people who can help empower you to make the choice to quit smoking. To learn more about strengthening your willpower, visit: http://lifecoachtoquitsmoking.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7635673

Want Your Loved One to Quit Smoking? Here is What NOT to Do

The struggle of doing it on your own.

If you have a loved one—a mum, dad, daughter, husband or best friend—who smokes, then you likely want to help him or her give up the deadly habit. But being a good quit smoking helper is not always an easy thing. And sometimes, the ways in which you try to help your loved one quit smoking can actually do more harm than good.

So how do you become a good quit smoking helper?

Well, becoming a good quit smoking helper is actually less about knowing what to do and more about knowing what not to do. So if you are accompanying someone you care about on a quit smoking journey, here are some behaviors you should not take along on the ride:

  • Condescending Behavior: Talking down to your loved one because he or she is struggling with a bad habit is a surefire way to help him or her lose confidence and build up resentment—resentment that can later be used to blame you for a failed quit smoking attempt. As a quit smoking supporter, you need to be very empathic—even if you yourself have never smoked. Quitting smoking is both brave and hard—don’t treat the smoker you love in way that makes him or her feel bad or ashamed or inferior. A smoker who feels like that will not be in the right psychological state to give up cigarettes.
  • Controlling Behavior: On the quit smoking journey, if you are not the smoker, then you are not in the driver’s seat. It is not your job to set ultimatums, provide willpower or make decisions vis-à-vis quitting smoking. Change is something that only comes from within. Change will only come from within the smoker—the smoker you loved will quit smoking because he or she has made the conscious decision to do so, not because you have made the decision for him or her.
  • Angry Behavior: Anger is not a constructive emotion when it comes to being a quit smoking supporter. Anger leads to fighting, shaming, and hopelessness. If the smoker you love takes a wrong turn, runs out of gas or gets a flat tire on the quit smoking journey, reacting in anger will only make things worse. Like all journeys, the quit smoking journey will have its ups and downs. It is up to you to be supportive by maintaining emotional balance and not giving in to anger.
  • Nagging Behavior: Nagging is never a way to get a positive outcome. Constantly harping on your loved one about quitting smoking while he or she is trying to quit smoking is psychologically stressful and can create tension and resentment in the relationship. Again, change comes from within. No amount of nagging on your part will create the authentic change from within needed for your loved one to quit smoking.
  • Negative Behavior: As a quit smoking supporter, you need to contribute to a positive healthy environment on the quit smoking journey. Negative thoughts, emotions and attitudes, then, should be kept at a minimum.

 

The quit smoking journey is not your journey. You are along for the ride as a helper—which means you need to engage in helpful behaviors. By avoiding the unhelpful behaviors listed above, you will naturally become supportive in a healthy way. And by being healthy, and truly supportive, you will increase your loved one’s chances of safe arrival at Smoke Free City tenfold.
Are you trying to help someone you love quit smoking?   We’d love to hear your experiences and get to know you better, so don’t forget to like us on Facebook/LifeCoachToLoseToQuitSmoking.  And if you want to give us a shout-out, let the world know via Twitter/YourLifePower!

Why is second hand smoking so bad?

It is common knowledge that smoking is one of the most deadly activities that you can engage in; indeed, every time you inhale a cigarette you bring over 4,000 chemicals and toxins into your body. It is also well known that secondhand smoke is just as dangerous as smoking; cigarette smoke still has those toxins after all. If you are interested in smoking cessation, then think of it as something that you not only do for yourself–you do it for the health and wellness of others around you.One highly problematic aspect of smoking indoors is that rooms get clogged with smoke. Children and babies are often left with no other option than to breathe in that smoke. And guess what? According to smoking cessation researchers, children and babies inhaling the air in a smoke-filled room is the equivalent of them smoking 10 cigarettes.Diseases affecting children caused by second hand smokeIf the numbers above don’t shock you, then keep reading. Children and infants breathe at much faster rates than adults. Children and infants breathe between 20-60 breaths per minutes while adults breathe 14-18 times per minute. This means that infants and children breathe in much more toxic smoke per minute than adults. When children are exposed to smoke, the risk for the following complications increases dramatically:

  • Respiratory illnesses like asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and bronchiolitis.
  • More frequent colds and coughs
  • More common middle ear infections
  • Possible cancer in childhood and/or adulthood.

If there is anything that can compel you to engage in smoking cessation, it should be the harm that secondhand smoke can do to children. The effect that tobacco smoke has on children should make you think twice about picking up that next cigarette. If you find that it is difficult to stop smoking then remember that above all, smoking is a habit. The body is not addicted to nicotine. The mind is addicted to the psycho-social habit. In order to overcome this habituated activity, smokers need to learn to mindfully practice mind over matter. That is why enlisting the help of a hypnotherapist is a great smoking cessation strategy. A hypnotherapist can help you locate old, destructive thought patterns (like the belief that you need to smoke) and then help you re-build new healthy ones (like the belief that you don’t need to smoke).

If you are serious about smoking cessation, and serious about the health of those around you, check out the hypnotherapy option and learn to get your thoughts and habits under your own control.

About the Author

Maureen Hamilton is an Integrated Neuro-Linguistic Programming Master Practitioner, Hypnotherapist and a Demartini Method Facilitator. Maureen has previously worked in many areas of health in Australia as well as overseas. Her health background includes training in general and midwifery nursing, mental health plus other modalities. Maureen is very much involved in promoting and assisting people to obtain optimal health and is absolutely committed to helping people to stop smoking and/or lose weight naturally using Hypnosis and NLP.
If you would like to find out more, visit http://masteryourlifepower.com and and talk to Maureen about your requirements.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7313405

What Is the Mind?

What is the mind? This many seem like an easy question, but, in fact, you may be at a loss for words when asked to define what the mind actually is. But this shouldn’t worry you too much-some of the greatest thinkers in history-from Plato to Kant to Sartre- have struggled to determine the workings of the human mind.

So is the mind your brain? Your feelings? Your ability to act as an agent in the world? Depending on culture, religion, or philosophical mode of thinking, the mind can be understood as all, none or some of these things. In psychology, however, the mind is generally agreed to be a set of certain cognitive faculties, originating in the brain, which work in tandem to allow humans (as well as animals) to think, judge, remember, perceive and above all live in a state of (sub)consciousness.

In psychoanalysis, beginning with Freud and Jung, the mind is usually divided into both the conscious and the subconscious:

• Conscious mind: All of the thoughts, actions, feelings, perceptions and beliefs that we are aware of.
• Subconscious mind: All of the thoughts, actions, feelings, perceptions and beliefs that are lodged in our memories or that exist in our minds without us being aware of them. Very often, the content of the subconscious mind appears during dreaming.

Psychoanalysis generally maintains that human beings are very often shaped and controlled by the content of their subconscious-rather than conscious-minds. Psychoanalytic therapy practices, such as hypnotherapy, very often target the subconscious mind in an effort to reveal its content to a patient so that he or she can resolve the conflicts lodged there (false beliefs, negative attitudes, destructive habits) in order to obtain a more psychologically integrated, healthy life.

Despite massive amounts of research, there is still so little we know about the mind and its power; indeed, as the old medical adage goes: human beings only use 10% of their brains. In this series of articles, then, we are going to take a closer look at the mind with respect to its potential vis-à-vis two important psychoanalytic practices: hypnotherapy and NLP. So if you are interested in learning more about your mind’s potential for healing and growth, stay tuned.

The human mind is a mysterious and powerful thing-but once you learn how to use it, you can bring health and healing to your life on so many levels. To learn more about how, visit trimslimhypnosis.com or get involved in the discussion on Facebook and Twitter.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7850668